1896 Print over 100 years old Spurgeon's Tabernacle

£69.95

3 in stock

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Description

Antique print dated 1896.

The page is over 100 years old and in good condition.

In order to enhance and protect the page we have set it within a gold frame with mount.

Frame size 400mm x 370mm. Available also in a brown with gold pencil-line frame, your choice.  RL.91.

Entitled – Spurgeon’s Tabernacle.

Below the picture an inscription reads:

Spurgeon’s Tabernacle. – Nearly opposite the Elephant and Castle, and on part of the ground formerly occupied by the Fishmongers’ Almshouses, stands the Metropolitan Tabernacle – better known as “Spurgeon’s Chapel” – the first stone of which was laid by Sir Samuel Morton Peto, in August, 1859.

The edifice, which is upwards of 144ft. long. 80ft. broad, and 60ft. high, is approached at the eastern end by a flight of steps extending the whole width of the building.

The principal entrances are beneath the noble portico, the entablature and pediment of which are supported by six Corinthian columns.

The chapel contains some 5,500 sittings of all kinds, but there is room for 6,000 persons without excessive crowding.

There are also a lecture-hall capable of holding about 900 people;  a schoolroom for 1,000 children, and six class-rooms, besides kitchens, lavatories, vestries, and store-rooms.

The congregation for whom this edifice was erected met originally in the New Park Street Chapel, Southwark, where, in December, 1853, Mr. Charles Haddon Spurgeon preached for the first time, being then nineteen years of age.

Spurgeon’s Tabernacle was built at a cost of £31,000, which sum was subscribed during the first seven years of the famous preacher’s ministry in London.

Spurgeon was born at  Kelvedon, in Essex, in June, 1834.

During the time that he occupied the platform at Exeter Hall paragraphs appeared in the newspapers announcing that “the Strand was blocked up by crowds who gathered to hear a young man in Exeter Hall.”

When Mr. Spurgeon first became popular in London, the Old Surrey Music Hall was on Sundays temporarily converted for the religious services held by the great preacher.

If you buy an item and then see it relisted this is because we occasionally have more than one available, each page is original and not a photocopy.


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